Stockholm Sweden Mormon Temple

June 11, 2008 by  
Filed under Temples in Europe

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Stockholm Sweden LDS TempleMormon Temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are special buildings dedicated to the Lord. Worthy church members may go to the Mormon temple to receive sacred ordinances and make covenants with God. Like baptism, these ordinances and covenants are necessary for the salvation of man. They must be performed in the temples of the Lord.
The Mormon temple is a house of learning. It is a place where all can gain a better understanding of the purpose of life and the relationship we all share with God and His Son, Jesus Christ.
All the Mormon temple ordinances are performed by the power of the priesthood. Through this power, ordinances performed on earth are sealed, or bound, in heaven.1 Only in the temple can a family be sealed together eternally. Marriage in the temple joins a man and woman as husband and wife eternally, if they honor their covenants.
God wants all His children to return and live with Him. For those who died without hearing the Gospel of Jesus Christ, He has provided a way through which all can either accept or reject the ordinances that have and will be done for them in the Mormon temple. All are taught the Gospel of Jesus Christ whether in this life or the next; all will have the opportunity!
The first Mormon missionary in Sweden was John E. Forsgren from Gavle, who had emigrated to the United States and joined the Mormon Church. He returned to Gavle in 1850 and baptized his brother Peter, the first convert in all of Scandinavia, and his sister Ericka. Word reached the government authorities about the Mormon conversion, and John was deported back to the United States. Other Mormon missionaries were sent, and the authorities continued to oppress the new members. One of the reasons that the Church was persecuted in Sweden, besides the fact that it drew people away from the state-supported Lutheran church, was that in the early days many Mormon members emigrated to the United States, specifically to Utah, so that they could enjoy participating in the Mormon temple, being near the prophet of the Church, and living in a society that shared their faith. Consequently, the Church did not grow in Sweden, and mass emigration continued until the 1950’s. When the Switzerland Temple was built, members were encouraged by the Church leaders to stay and build up the Mormon Church in their home countries.
In 1910 the proposal to ban Mormon missionaries was brought before the ‘riksdag’ and King Gustaf V. The proposal was defeated, and Mormon missionaries were permitted to preach the Gospel.
The announcement of the Stockholm Sweden Temple in 1981 received virtually no opposition. The city of Vasterhaninge was chosen by Mormon Church leaders in which to build the Mormon Temple. City officials welcomed the temple project, and later the city showed further support of the Mormon Temple by changing the name of the street on which the temple is located to Temple Drive. 2
The Mormon temple sits on a six-acre lot with its six spires rising above the pines in the nearby forest and where a cobblestone path leads to its doors.
On July 2, 1985, President Gordon B. Hinckley, Mormon Prophet, dedicated the Stockholm Sweden Temple. The temple serves members of the Mormon Church from the countries of Sweden, Finland, Russia, Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia.

Mailing address:
Tempelvägen 5
SE-137 41 Västerhaninge
SWEDEN
Phone:   (46) 8-500-655-00

1 Holy Bible, Matthew 16:19

2 “The First 100 Temples”, by Chad Hawkins, 2001, p95

Summary
Article Name
Stockholm Sweden Mormon Temple
Description
A description and history of the Stockholm Sweden Mormon Temple

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